Comprehensive Hematology

Radiation Therapy

                    How it Works Against Cancer

Cells normally grow and divide to form new cells. But cancer cells grow and divide faster than most normal cells. At high doses, radiation therapy kills cancer cells or slows their growth by damaging their DNA. Cancer cells stop dividing or die when DNA is damaged beyond repair. When the damaged cells die, they are broken down and removed by the body.

 

Radiation therapy does not kill cancer cells right away. That is why it takes days or weeks of treatment before DNA is damaged enough Cancer cells keep dying for weeks or months after radiation therapy treatment ends.

     Depending upon the type of cancer and where it is locate patients may                   receive radiation therapy before, during, or after surgery and/or                                 chemotherapy.

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Radiation Therapy

                     Treatment & Services
  • External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT 3D Conformal Therapy)

Using a special X-ray machine called a linear accelerator, EBRT delivers high-energy rays to tumors. The machine delivers radiation from any angle and shapes radiation beams to the contour of the tumor. The machine moves around the body without touching the patient, aiming radiation at the cancer. Some types of focused EBRT target a tumor with higher, more precise doses of radiation, while reducing damage to healthy tissue and nearby organs. As a result, EBRT may help reduce the risk of side effects associated with traditional radiation treatment.

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  • Intensity Modulation Radiation Therapy (IMRT)

Based on tumor size, shape, and location advanced software plans a precise dose of radiation. A computer-controlled device delivers the radiation in sculpted doses that match the 3-D geometrical shape of the tumor, including concave and complex shapes. The intensity of radiation beam can be adjusted across the treatment area in fractioned, separate beams as precision accuracy. This means higher doses of radiation can be delivered than traditional radiaton therapy methods, while reducing exposure to healthy tissues. Because of its greater degree of accuracy, IMRT may be a treatment option for patients who have reached the maximum allowable dose of conventional radiation therapy and have a recurrent tumor in the treated area.

  • Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

SBRT delivers very high doses of radiation to precisely target the tumor by using several beams of various intensities aimed at different angles. Because of its precision, SBRT can preserve surrounding healthy tissue, which is important for patients who have tumors that are near, or in, essential organs. Stereotactic body radiation works similarly to other forms of radiation treatment. SBRT does not actually remove the tumor, but rather causes it to shrink.By damaging the cells of the tumor, it becomes unable to grow. Malignant and metastatic tumors may shrink more rapidly, even within a couple of months. or in, essential organs. Stereotactic body radiation works similarly to other forms of radiation treatment. SBRT does not actually remove the tumor, but rather causes it to shrink.By damaging the cells of the tumor, it becomes unable to grow. Malignant and metastatic tumors may shrink more rapidly, even within a couple of months.

  • Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT)

Doctors use imaging tests to precisely locate and measure the size and shape of a tumor. Computer software compares the reference images. A linear accelerator then delivers targeted radiation to tumors while avoiding healthy tissue.

IGRT makes it possible for a radiation therapist to narrowly focus powerful radiation beams on a targeted tumor, even as the tumor shrinks over time or moves during a patient’s natural breathing cycle. As a result, image guided radiation therapy can help ensure the safe administration of the highest radiation treatment dosage prescribed for a patient.

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Comprehensive Hematology